Others move ahead on Medicaid while N.C. stands still

New Hampshire became the latest state to move ahead with a Medicaid expansion tailored to the preferences of their state (adults with incomes up to 138% of poverty can be covered by their Medicaid managed care program, or they can receive payments to subsidize employer provided health insurance for workers with low wages). New Hampshire has divided government (Dem Governor, divided Legislature), as does Arkansas that has adopted a privatized Medicaid expansion under which federal money will be used to purchase private health insurance for those who would otherwise qualify for Medicaid.

So far 7 states with Republican Governors have managed to figure out a beneficial means of expanding Medicaid in spite of not being a big fan of the President’s, and 3 others: Utah, Pennsylvania, and Indiana are currently negotiating with the federal government to obtain waivers that will allow them to expand under state-specific details/models (that generally include some sort of privatized expansion).

Drew Altman notes that Red States will pay close attention to what other Red States do regarding Medicaid expansion/health reform, and there will likely be a drip-drip-drip move toward expansion/reform proposals that make sense within the politics of a given State, that will eventually give way to a rush of expansions except for perhaps the deep south. In North Carolina, which is totally red in terms of control (Governor, both state houses), but which had the closest margin of any State in the last two Presidential elections (14,000 and about 100,000 votes), the Republican party appears to be dead in the water on Medicaid, unable to negotiate with itself, leaving our state which was once thought of as a leader in the South, relegated to the sidelines to watch others embark on state-specific reform plans.

About Don Taylor
Professor of Public Policy at Duke University (with appointments in Business, Nursing, Community and Family Medicine, and the Duke Clinical Research Institute). I am one of the founding faculty of the Margolis Center for Health Policy, and currently serve as Chair of Duke's University Priorities Committee (UPC). My research focuses on improving care for persons who are dying, and I am co-PI of a CMMI award in Community Based Palliative Care. I teach both undergrads and grad students at Duke. On twitter @donaldhtaylorjr

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