Burwell Nomination: Faint echoes of a deal post ’14?

President Obama has nominated Sylvia Burwell to replace Kathleen Sebelius as Secretary of HHS. Burwell is the Director of the Office of Management and Budget and is noted for relatively good relations with Congressional Republicans. She is the type of person who could help broker a deal for modifications of the ACA after the 2014 election.

Changes to the ACA at some point are as inevitable as water seeking the lowest point when poured out of a glass. The question is when the politics allow the first deal that can improve the policy? In any sane system, we would have already revisited multiple things, but Republicans have heretofore chosen complete opposition. That may still be their best 2014 election strategy, but they are in dangerous territory of rendering themselves to be post-policy in the most important and difficult long run issue facing our country.

As easy and perhaps as effective as repeal blah blah blah is for 2014, I will be shocked if it is anything but a disaster for Republicans in 2016. A smart Republican nominee would want Congressional Republicans and the White House to reach a deal on some modifications. Hillary Clinton likely wouldn’t mind, and the Big Dog certainly would not. And Burwell is a signal that the POTUS wants this as well.

What are some relatively simple modifications?

  • Replace the individual mandate with auto enroll procedures plus open enrollment with underwriting allowed if you don’t come in during the enrollment period as proposed by the Coburn-Burr-Hatch policy put out in January 2014.
  • Smooth the “cliff” effect of the ACA exchange subsidy structure by allowing persons with incomes above 400% of poverty to deduct their health insurance premiums. Most people get federal subsidy for their health insurance. We need a rationalization of the amounts and circumstances, but that will take time. This would be a placeholder and would reduce worries about employment effects of high implicit marginal tax rates from the subsidy cliff (that Coburn-Burr-Hatch shares).
  • Replace the cadillac tax with a capping of the tax exlcusion. Coburn-Burr-Hatch initially proposed quite an aggressive cap level, then backed off, but the private score has never been updated. So, they talk up one score, but another policy. In any event, not sure of the level, but capping the tax exclusion of ESI is a better policy because it signals the change to the person getting the now unlimited subsidy–people like me with good employer sponsored health insurance.

More complicated, but places I could see a deal going.

  • Provide more routinized state flexibility for states to do a variety of things with the low income portion of Medicaid. States can get waivers and the like as Arkansas is doing for a privatized Medicaid expansion, but this process could be made easier. I would want to be very cautious with changes in the dual eligible and long term disabled portions of Medicaid. We need a way to get the South to participate fully in health reform.
  • Decide what the maximum deductible should be, and create a “copper” level plan that might even simply be financial protection. Such a plan could even be what States auto enroll persons into. I would be open to an explicitly different max deductible amount by age (more for younger, less for older) and seek to get as close to universal coverage as we could. There are quite high deductibles in allowed in ACA plans now.

Eventually there will be a deal, just like water flows to the low point. The question is when will the politics be right for some of the things above?

About Don Taylor
Professor of Public Policy at Duke University (with appointments in Business, Nursing, Community and Family Medicine, and the Duke Clinical Research Institute). I am one of the founding faculty of the Margolis Center for Health Policy, and currently serve as Chair of Duke's University Priorities Committee (UPC). My research focuses on improving care for persons who are dying, and I am co-PI of a CMMI award in Community Based Palliative Care. I teach both undergrads and grad students at Duke. On twitter @donaldhtaylorjr

One Response to Burwell Nomination: Faint echoes of a deal post ’14?

  1. Pingback: Conservatives rediscover their dislike of ESI | freeforall

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